By Sybaris

The new Covid-19 era has locked but also turned the world upside down and now everybody is developing new strategies for face over the social distancing, specially those spaces where the physical presence is important for having a direct experiences—susch as museums and art galleries. But how this new ways for seeing art can affect our aesthetic experiencies? Is it enough to take the art to online platforms? 

In recent months we have heard more constantly new digital terms or existing terms that are having a bloom becuse this new reality were are living in is demanding to practicaly live on the web. As we’ve mentioned here before, the art market has taking advantage of the online platforms and dynamics to renew their auctions. And so have done the museum and art galleries. However, it seems that their strategies are being more conservatives: the common proposal is to take the “white cube” to the digital space.

The newest space in this context is TheVOV, an English online art platforms that offers past exhibitions for you to see online and on demand in XR. “Founded on an urgency to support the arts at a critical time, theVOV is a new virtual ecosystem presenting landmark exhibitions”.

To make it possible, several museums and cultural institutions from the UK has joined to theVov to take their past exhibitions from the archive boxes and launch them online again through what theVov calls the Phygital Era a space “where the physical and digital coexist closer than ever”.

Thus, if you missed an exhibition from the Hayward Gallery, the Tate, Drawing Room, Goldsmiths CCA, South London Gallery, Turner Contemporary, National Galleries of Scotland, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, among others, now you can see it online. Evey monday, theVOV launches tree exhibitions for you to enjoy them for a short period of time. You can see the scheduled and upcomint events on their website: www.thevov.art

Season One’s inspiring programme of exhibitions includes the return of Chris Burden’s iconic 14 Magnolia Doubles to South London Gallery after 15 years; a virtual rehanging of Andreas Gursky’s first major UK retrospective at the Hayward Gallery in 2018; Yinka Shonibare CBE RA’s open air installation at Yorkshire Sculpture Park 2013; and Lisa Brice’s 2018 Art Now exhibition at Tate Britain.